Sukiyaki & Shabu Shabu – What’s The Difference?

Shabu Shabu Vs Sukiyaki copy

Unless you’re Japanese or an expert on the topic of Japanese cuisine, chances are you wouldn’t be able to differentiate between Japanese sukiyaki and shabu-shabu. Believe us, not even die-hard foodies know the difference so it’s totally understandable that you don’t.

Quit making the mistake of thinking that both of them are the same because they’re worlds apart.

For one, sukiyaki is not hot pot, despite the fact that it is typically eaten out of a pot. Sure, it’s a one-pot-meal (essentially) but there is no soup nor stock involved—rather, a sauce. Shabu-Shabu, on the other hand, bears similar qualities of the conventional hot pot in that raw ingredients are cooked in a pot of boiling water or broth but still, there are some differences.
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Creamier In Toa Payoh Is Closing On 30 June 2019!

creamier-peanut-butter-jelly-ice-cream copy

Best known for being a heartland artisanal ice cream gem, Creamier has long been a go-to for lovers of good, honest ice cream and coffee, as well as a humble respite from the hustle and bustle. Sad to say, the folks here will be hanging up their aprons come 30 June 2019.

No concrete reason was given about their sudden decision to close, but here’s what we do know based on their announcement so far.
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18 Steaks In Singapore Where It’s A Crime To Ask For Well-Done

Steak Guide 2019

Few things come close to the sheer majesty that sinking one’s teeth into a quality steak entails; the flavour of buttery beefiness oozing all over the tongue, enveloped by a smoky flavour and brought to life with speckles of sea salt. Cooked perfectly, be it roasted and finished under a broiler, grilled or even sous vide, a properly cooked steak can be life-changing. Period.

A good steak will always reign supreme among the food-obsessed and is almost always money well spent. Whether you’re looking to spend lavishly, indulging in the crème de la crème of beefy divinity or simply a more economically-friendly alternative just to curb your cravings, here is our list of 18 places in Singapore to get a very, very good steak.
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Lana Cake Shop’s Legacy Will Live On With The Founder’s Son Taking Over

Lana Chocolate Cake

When the founder of Lana Cake Shop, Violet Kwan, announced back in 2016 that she was ready to call it quits, and was offering to handover her pride and joy (her shop) to potential buyers, many Singaporeans were called to attention. Many of whom had grown up eating her iconic Chocolate Fudge Cake, either for birthdays or just because.

In an interview with Straits Times, Mr Jason Kwan (the founder’s son) shared his decision to continue his mother’s legacy. Having left his previous job as a banker, he has been working on revitalising Lana Cake Shop over the past 18 months, breathing new life and improving it slowly from branding to work processes.

Of course, not forgetting perfecting his mother’s timeless Chocolate Fudge Cake recipe.
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Red Star Restaurant – One Of The Last Surviving Push Cart Dim Sum Restaurants In Singapore

Red Star Restaurant

A highly celebrated stalwart in the Chinese dim sum scene here in Singapore, Red Star Restaurant is one that needs no introduction.

Red Star Dim Sum Trolley

Here is where one can relish in a large selection of dim sum goodies be it steamed or fried and have them served to you table-side via food trolleys—the traditional way. Standing as one of the few Chinese restaurants left in Singapore (or at least the only one we know about) that still serves dim sum this way, Red Star Restaurant is a gem that many loyal patrons, new and old, hold dear.

If you’d like to experience proper Cantonese dim sum dining the traditional way, then Red Star Restaurant is where it’s at.
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Lavender’s Famous Kok Kee Wanton Noodle Is Re-Opening In March 2019

Kok Kee Wanton Mee copy

It seems these many years of hopeless praying has finally paid off, because, at long last, one of our all-time favourite wanton mee stalls is re-opening.

Kok Kee Wanton Mee, famous for their uniquely sweetish, lard-based sauce and springy egg noodles that just make the simple dish so delicious. For those unfamiliar, their version of this noodle classic is very straightforward, just wanton noodles, slices of char siew and steamed wantons served in a flavourful soup—no fried wantons or any other side dishes.

Feeling a sense of nostalgia creeping in? Here’s where you can finally have this again come March 2019.
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Wan Niu Wan – Amazing S$19.90 Wagyu Donburi At PasarBella For A Limited Time Only

Wan Niu Wan Group Shot

A brand new addition to PasarBella’s last standing outlet in Suntec City is Japanese donburi specialist, Wan Niu Wan. They mainly focus on meat-based dishes using top-quality stuff such as Iberico pork jowl, Karubi short ribs and of course, the luxe Wagyu.

An easy, quick and surprisingly wallet-friendly option in the heart of town, donburi is a great option to consider but what sets these folks apart is their clear attention to detail and the way that they treat their meat pre and post cooking, resulting in a rice bowl that’s well balanced.
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Hong Kong’s Famous Lin Heung Tea House Is Not Closing For Good

Lin-Heung-Tea-House Renewed

Proudly standing as one of Hong Kong’s oldest and most popular tea houses and perhaps one of the only few places left that still serve dim sum the traditional way—chaos, screaming old ladies and all—Lin Heung Tea House was speculated to close for good in February 2019 but has since, managed to renew its lease for another 3 years, operating under a new name, Lin Heung Tea Room, on March 1—so hoorah for that!

Hailed as one of the top attractions in Hong Kong and a tourist hot spot for those who crave the ultimate and most authentic dim sum experience, the age-old establishment is one spot to visit if you want to experience traditional Cantonese dim sum.
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