How to cook the perfect steak

How to cook the perfect steak

Chef Robin Ho is no stranger in the local food & beverage scene. He is the current group executive chef of the Prive Group, and he has previously helmed the kitchens of Les Amis Restaurants, and The Marmalade Group of restaurants.

And for one, he sure knows a thing or two about steaks. We sat down with him to discuss about the different cuts and some of the things to look out for when you are cooking steak at home.

Here are 5 tips for cooking the perfect steak.

1. Choose the right meat.

“The most important thing is to get the right cut,” says Chef Robin. There are many different cuts, it really boils down to personal preference. For those who prefer lean meat, tenderloin is the obvious choice. Otherwise, ribeye is one of the favourite cuts as it has the most fat as compared to the others. Knowing your favourite meat is the key to cooking the perfect steak. And your local butcher will always be the best source of advice on choosing the right cuts of meat.

2. Leave the meat in room temperature before cooking.

Take out the steaks from the refrigerator, cover them with a sheet for at least 25 to 30 minutes to allow the steaks to come to room temperature.

Filet Mignon

3. Season the meat with good salt.

Keep it simple. Use good rock salt to season the steak, and let the deliciousness of the beef speak for itself.

4. Use a good pan.

Not everyone can afford the superb but expensive Josper Grill in the kitchen, so the best alternative is to use a good pan.

Choose a good thick-bottomed pan (cast-iron is the best option because it transfers heat better) to cook the steak. Non-sticky pans are easy to use, but we would suggest avoiding them as they tend to prevent a good crust from forming.

5. Let the steak rest before serving

Allow the steak rest for about 5 minutes (200g steak) before serving, as this allows the juices that have been drawn to the surface to relax and flow evenly through the meat.

5 COMMENTS

Chef Robin Ho is really fun. We went to a wagyu farm in Kyushu together last year with other chefs and we really loved the steak, shabu-shabu and BBQ there. A little trip to wagyu heaven.

It’s like telling an unskilled tennis player to buy expensive tennis rackets, top of the range tennis shoes, good balls, and expect him to play like Federer. You’re really not telling the person “how to cook”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>